US diplomat's fugitive wife Anne Sacoolas 'told dying Harry Dunn, 19, she would get help after fatal crash' as she finally apologises and admits she 'was driving on wrong side of road'

  • In a statement issued by her lawyers, Sacoolas said she had 'no time to react' 
  • In her first account of the crash, she said she spoke to the 19-year-old at scene
  • The mother of three, 42, said she was 'terribly, terribly sorry for tragic mistake'
  • She said she wanted to meet Harry's family to 'apologise and take responsibility'
  • It is seven weeks since horror crash outside RAF Croughton, Northamptonshire
  • Dunn's family today threatened to launch judicial review into immunity decision 

Anne Sacoolas (pictured), 42, said she had 'no time to react' when the teenager came towards her on his motorbike over a hill

Anne Sacoolas (pictured), 42, said she had 'no time to react' when the teenager came towards her on his motorbike over a hill 

The US diplomat's wife accused of killing Harry Dunn in a head-on crash said she spoke to him before he died as she admitted for the first time she was driving on the wrong side of the road. 

Anne Sacoolas, 42, said she had 'no time to react' when the teenager came towards her on his motorbike over a hill.

A statement issued by her lawyers said: 'Anne stayed on the scene of the accident to assist. She spoke to Harry Dunn to tell him that she would call for help'. 

In her first account of what happened, she also said she flagged down another driver and then went to comfort her own children, who were in her crashed Volvo SUV.

The mother of three, who is in hiding in America after flying home on a state-sponsored private jet, said she was 'terribly, terribly sorry for that tragic mistake'.

It came as the Dunn family threatened a judicial review in the High Court asking the Foreign Office {FCO] to hand over all documents it has about the decision to grant her diplomatic immunity.

They also accused Tory Dominic Raab of being 'cold and rude' in meetings with them as they slammed the Foreign Secretary's handling of case having previously said: 'He didn't know his a**e from his elbow'. 

Spokesman Radd Seiger said last night: 'We are going to write to the FCO very shortly, explaining that we don't want to do a judicial review, but to avoid that, please let us have the following documents - all e-mails, messages and notes in relation to your advice to Northamptonshire Police that this lady had it [diplomatic immunity].

'What we don't know is whether somebody cocked up or whether they were put under pressure by the Americans to concede.

'But we want to conduct an investigation into the FCO's decision to advise Northamptonshire Police that this lady had the benefit of diplomatic immunity.

'If we're not satisfied, then we'll go to a judicial review and ask a High Court judge to review it all.'

Mrs Sacoolas, the wife of a US intelligence officer, has said she wanted to meet Harry's family to 'apologise and take responsibility'. 

In her first account of what happened, she also said she spoke to 19-year-old Harry (pictured) at the scene before comforting her own children, who were in her car

In her first account of what happened, she also said she spoke to 19-year-old Harry (pictured) at the scene before comforting her own children, who were in her car 

Mrs Sacoolas, whose husband Jonathan worked as US intelligence official at the base, claimed diplomatic immunity and left the UK. Pictured: Harry Dunn's family in New York

Mrs Sacoolas, whose husband Jonathan worked as US intelligence official at the base, claimed diplomatic immunity and left the UK. Pictured: Harry Dunn's family in New York

On Saturday, before the family left for the US, they received a letter from Mr Raab, saying that Mrs Sacoolass, 42, no longer had immunity.

'The letter is worded very carefully, they're not saying it's just a change of heart - they are saying that it's an evolution,' said Mr Seiger.

'Rude' Dominic Raab 'not happy' about High Court threat, says family lawyer

Dominic Raab was unhappy with a plan to take the Foreign Office to court for a judicial review into advice given by the Foreign and Commonwealth Office.

Family lawyer Radd Seiger said that the Director of Protocol at the Foreign Office, Neil Holland, would 'welcome' the idea of handing documents over to the family's lawyers.

But Foreign Minister Raab appeared  less happy.

He continued: 'I told Dominic Raab, I'm going to launch a judicial review - and he didn't like the sound of that.

'They were twitchy (at the meeting with the family), there were three lawyers in the room - why would you bring three lawyers into a room with a grieving mother. Why?

'There were 12 people in a room - for a meeting that was supposed to be him expressing his condolences.

'He (Mr Raab) was stiff, he was cold, he was unpleasant, he was rude. Then three days later we get another letter. That isn't right.

'The evolution doesn't happen in three days.'

The FCO has been contacted for comment.

 

He also said that the family's lawyers, Mark Stephens and Geoffrey Robertson QC, believe 'they've (the FCO) been lying to you'.

Ms Charles and Mr Dunn said: 'We were astonished last Saturday to receive the hand-delivered letter from the FCO indicating that Mrs Sacoolas did not in fact have diplomatic immunity.

'We were still reeling from our terrible meeting with Dominic Raab, Foreign Secretary, last Wednesday, just three days earlier, where he was adamant that Mrs Sacoolas did have immunity.

'Something is not right. We will not rest until we get the truth. We will not let Harry passing be in vain.'

Her lawyer, Amy Jeffress, from US firm Arnold & Porter, said the diplomat's wife had stayed at the scene of the crash and flagged down other people to help the teenager. 

She said: 'Anne was driving on the wrong side of the road and had no time to react when she saw the motorbike – the crash happened too fast.

'Anne stayed on the scene of the accident to assist. She spoke to Harry Dunn to tell him that she would call for help. She waved down another car.

'That driver pulled over and offered to assist Harry so that Anne could comfort her young children, who had been in her car and were on the scene.'

The spokesman added that Ministry of Defence police arrived shortly after the crash but it took a 'long time' for the ambulance to arrive. 

It is seven weeks since Mrs Sacoolas collided with Harry's motorbike on the road outside RAF Croughton in Northamptonshire. 

Mrs Sacoolas, whose husband Jonathan worked as US intelligence official at the base, claimed diplomatic immunity and left the UK.

It is seven weeks since Mrs Sacoolas collided with Harry's motorbike (pictured) on the road outside RAF Croughton in Northamptonshire

It is seven weeks since Mrs Sacoolas collided with Harry's motorbike (pictured) on the road outside RAF Croughton in Northamptonshire 

Harry's family said today they may launch a judicial review into the decision by Northamptonshire Police to give her diplomatic immunity. 

Anne Sacoolas's statement went on: 'She and her family left the United Kingdom approximately three weeks after the accident, after they and the US authorities determined that it would be difficult for the couple and their children to remain in the small Croughton community under these tragic circumstances.

'She and her family returned home on a commercial flight. Our understanding is that the British authorities were informed and aware of their departure before they returned to the United States.'

This morning, former British Foreign Secretary Jeremy Hunt said the U.S. had been disrespectful to the the U.K. in its handling of the issue.

He told Sky News: 'I think it was a mistake to spirit her out of the country. I think it was immensely disrespectful to Harry Dunn's family.

'How would they [the U.S] feel if the boot was on the other foot? If a British diplomat's partner in America had done the same and we just spirited them out of the country.'

Early today a spokesman said the legal team would write to the Foreign Office asking for documents relating to the decision to grant Mrs Sacoolas immunity. 

Spokesman Radd Seiger said: 'We are going to write to the Foreign and Commonwealth Office very shortly, explaining that we don't want to do a judicial review, but to avoid that, please let us have the following documents - all emails, messages and notes in relation to your advice to Northamptonshire Police that this lady had it (diplomatic immunity).

'What we don't know is whether somebody cocked up or whether they were put under pressure by the Americans to concede.

'But we want to conduct an investigation into the Foreign and Commonwealth Office's decision to advise Northamptonshire Police that this lady had the benefit of diplomatic immunity.

'If we're not satisfied, then we'll go to a judicial review and ask a High Court judge to review it all.'

The developments came after Harry's father told of the final words he said to his teenage son as he lay fatally injured after being hit by a car.

Tim Dunn, who had reached the scene of the accident when Harry was still alive, said: 'I could see broken bones coming out of his arms, but he was talking. I called over and said: 'Harry, it's your dad, they are going to fix you, be calm.'

'He stopped moaning and calmed then,' he told US news channel CBS, 'and a couple of minutes later one of the doctors said they needed to sedate him because he was having trouble breathing.'

Tim Dunn (pictured), who had reached the scene of the accident when the 19-year-old was still alive, said: 'I could see broken bones coming out of his arms, but he was talking

Tim Dunn (pictured), who had reached the scene of the accident when the 19-year-old was still alive, said: 'I could see broken bones coming out of his arms, but he was talking

Mr Dunn told his son (pictured with mother Charlotte) he would be sedated because it was 'for the best' and said he would see him in hospital

Mr Dunn told his son (pictured with mother Charlotte) he would be sedated because it was 'for the best' and said he would see him in hospital

Mr Dunn told his son he would be sedated because it was 'for the best' and said he would see him in hospital. 

These were the last words between father and son as Harry never woke up.

After flying to the US, Harry's parents are on a campaign to get Mrs Sacoolas to return. Speaking at a Press conference in New York, his mother Charlotte Charles said: 'She needs to do the right thing and come back and face what she has done. Face our family. Face the UK justice system.'

Asked what he would say to Donald Trump, Mr Dunn said: 'I would say to him as a man, as a father, how could you let this happen? If you are a father and your child died surely you'd want that person to own up and take responsibility for their actions.' 

On Saturday, Foreign Secretary Dominic Raab wrote to Harry's family saying that Mrs Sacoolas no longer had diplomatic immunity from potential prosecution because her husband had left his posting at the RAF base.

If Northamptonshire Police submit a file of evidence which meets the US extradition threshold, she could be extradited to face justice here.

Diplomat's wife Anne Sacoolas apologises for fatal car crash

The comments below have not been moderated.

The views expressed in the contents above are those of our users and do not necessarily reflect the views of MailOnline.

We are no longer accepting comments on this article.