Six Labour MPs defy Jeremy Corbyn to vote with the government on crunch No Deal amendment - but they will not be kicked out of the party amid more Party chaos

  • Labour backs Sir Oliver Letwin amendment forcing PM to ask for Brexit delay
  • But six Labour MPs defied Jeremy Corbyn to vote alongside the government
  • Understood that the half a dozen rebels will not be punished by Labour whips 

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Labour was plunged into fresh Brexit chaos this afternoon after half a dozen MPs sided with the government on a crunch No Deal vote in the House of Commons. 

A rebel amendment put forward by Sir Oliver Letwin which will force Boris Johnson to ask the EU for a Brexit delay was agreed by 322 votes to 306, a majority of 16. 

Labour supported the move but six of the party's MPs decided to defy Jeremy Corbyn and vote with the government in a failed attempt to stop Mr Johnson's Brexit plans being scuppered. 

Attention immediately turned to whether the rebels will now face disciplinary action. 

But MailOnline understands the six MPs - Sir Kevin Barron, Ronnie Campbell, Jim Fitzpatrick, Caroline Flint, Kate Hoey and John Mann - will receive a slap on the wrist from party whips and nothing more. 

Mr Corbyn had suggested last week that Labour MPs who backed the government on Brexit would not be expelled from the party. 

He said at the time that he believed 'in the power of persuasion rather than the power of threat'.

The Labour leader blasted Boris Johnson's Brexit deal as a 'sell-out' as he squared off against the Prime minister in the Commons today

The Labour leader blasted Boris Johnson's Brexit deal as a 'sell-out' as he squared off against the Prime minister in the Commons today

Mr Johnson wanted MPs to vote on his proposed divorce deal but his plans were scuppered by a rebel amendment

Mr Johnson wanted MPs to vote on his proposed divorce deal but his plans were scuppered by a rebel amendment 

Mr Corbyn today labelled Mr Johnson's new Brexit deal a 'sell-out' as he squared off against the PM in the Commons ahead of the vote on the Letwin amendment. 

Sir Oliver's amendment means that the PM was unable to put his deal to a meaningful vote, triggering an anti-No Deal law called the Benn Act which requires Mr Johnson to now ask the EU for a Brexit delay beyond October 31. 

If Labour had not backed the amendment or if the party had abstained it would have been defeated.

Mr Corbyn re-iterated his desire for a second referendum as he addressed the Commons. 

He said the proposed deal put forward by Mr Johnson would 'be a disaster for working people' because it would 'hammer the economy, cost jobs and sell workers’ rights down the river'.

He said: 'Voting for a deal today won't end Brexit. It won't deliver certainty and the people should have the final say.

'Labour is not prepared to sell-out the communities we represent. We are not prepared to sell out their future. And we will not back this sell-out deal.'

Mr Johnson said Mr Corbyn was 'wrong' in his criticism of the draft accord as the PM said: 'This government, this country will maintain the very highest standards and we will lead in environmental protection and social protection in Europe and across the world.'

He added: 'He talks about trust - this is a right honourable gentleman... who patently does not trust his own party, he doesn't trust the shadow chancellor (John McDonnell).

'Above all he has not been willing to trust the people of this country by granting them the right to adjudicate on him and his policies in a general election.

'He won't trust the people and he doesn't trust the people by delivering on the result of their referendum in 2016.

'I suggest in all humility and candour to the House that they should ignore the pleadings of (Mr Corbyn) and vote for an excellent deal that will take this country and take the whole of Europe forward.' 

More Labour Brexit chaos as six MPs defy Jeremy Corbyn

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