EXCLUSIVE: Purple Rain star Morris Day says Prince was surrounded by 'yes men' who were 'too scared' to deny him drugs and reveals he reconciled with him two months before his death after the singer told him 'I love you'

  • Morris Day spoke on on his longtime friendship with Prince, in an exclusive interview with DailyMailTV 
  • The Time frontman claimed the pop legend was surrounded by 'yes men' who enabled his drug addiction that ultimately contributed to his death in 2016  
  • 'He had a lot of yes men around him and nobody to say "hey, do you know what you're doing?"' Day, 61, said at the signing of his new memoir earlier this month
  • Day and Prince became friends as teenagers and started off as music allies, collaborating on projects and films, including Purple Rain in 1984
  • After a musical rivalry spawned from tour fighting and jealousy, the pair fell out and Day went solo
  • He revealed they finally reconciled their years-long feud two months before Prince's death when he invited him to perform at a private party at his home  
  • 'We talked after the show, and he said I love you and he gave me a hug,' Day said 

Pop legend Prince's long-time friend Morris Day has accused 'yes men' of enabling the star's addiction to pain medication, in an exclusive interview with DailyMailTV.

Day, 61, starred as Prince's opposite number in 1984 film Purple Rain and helped produce his early albums before their friendship broke down over jealous squabbles.

But The Time front man revealed he reconciled his decades-long feud with the artist when Prince told him 'I love you' just two months before he died – and now wonders whether the iconic singer knew his time was up.

Day opened up about his friend, who died from a fentanyl overdose in April 2016, at the 35th anniversary showing of Purple Rain at the TCL Chinese Theater in Hollywood earlier this month.

He held a signing at the theater for his new memoir, On Time: A Princely Life in Funk, which documents the two singers' troubled friendship and fiery fall out.

Day, himself a former addict, told DailyMailTV he might have been able to save Prince had he been around to spot the warning signs of the star's alleged prescription medication abuse.

Prince's long-time friend Morris Day (pictured together in the 80s) spoke about their friendship as well as their years-long feud, in an exclusive interview with DailyMailTV

Prince's long-time friend Morris Day (pictured together in the 80s) spoke about their friendship as well as their years-long feud, in an exclusive interview with DailyMailTV 

Day, 61, starred alongside Prince in musical film, Purple Rain in 1984 - which grossed $70million - and helped produce his early albums

Day, 61, starred alongside Prince in musical film, Purple Rain in 1984 - which grossed $70million - and helped produce his early albums

Instead, the Jungle Love singer claimed, Prince was surrounded by 'yes men' who were 'scared' to deny the star's demands for drugs.

'He had people to who he was like "go get me another whatever", and those people were too scared to say "no I won't do it," even though they might have feared he was impacting himself in a negative way,' Day said.

'He had a lot of yes men around him and nobody to say "hey, do you know what you're doing?" or "hey, I'm not going to go get this prescription for you because I don't think you know what you're up against." He needed someone talking real talk to him.'

Last year police confirmed there would be no criminal charges over Prince's death, and Day agrees that the ultimate responsibility for Prince's addiction lay with the star himself.

'It's hard to say someone should or needs to be brought to justice,' Day said.

'At the end of the day when I was doing drugs a lot of people got me drugs. But who wanted them and who did them? I did. So It is really hard to point the finger when you are the one that is saying "get me this" and I am the one doing it.'

Earlier this year Prince's managers and music business veterans John Meglen and Paul Gongaware revealed their client took a cocktail of drugs including fentanyl as he 'was looking for something to numb' his pain rather than rest or seek medical help.

'We were close, because it was just Paul and I and Prince, and there was no manager, no lawyer, no business manager, no agent, no one involved in our project,' Meglen said.

He claims the singer was surrounded by 'yes men' who enabled his drug addiction. Prince (pictured in 1985) died from a fentanyl overdose in April 2016

He claims the singer was surrounded by 'yes men' who enabled his drug addiction. Prince (pictured in 1985) died from a fentanyl overdose in April 2016

Morris Day was the lead singer of his own band, The Time
The Time frontman spoke out at a signing for his new memoir, On Time: A Princely Life in Funk, which documents the two singers' troubled friendship and fiery fall out

The Time frontman spoke out at a signing (right) for his new memoir, On Time: A Princely Life in Funk, which documents the two singers' troubled friendship and fiery fall out, at the TCL Chinese Theater in Hollywood earlier this month

'So yes, we saw that his hip was bothering him. Honestly, we tried to talk to him about it and he told us, like artists do sometimes, "You have no right to talk to me about that."

'That's how he answered us, so, you know, you try, but it's sad when you see that. For artists sometimes it's tougher. They're in the limelight, they've got that pressure, looking for something to numb them out, or whatever it is, I don't know. But it's really, really sad.'

Day said Prince's alleged drug abuse had a harder impact on his health because it came later in his life, making any recovery near-impossible.

'I went through a very traumatic situation with drugs in my life. I went to my knees with it, but it was early in my life,' Day told DailyMailTV. 'When I went through it I was in my 20s; he was in his late 50s.

'At the time he was going through whatever it was, and I hear it was drugs, it was too late in life. His body wasn't strong enough to rebound and get him through it.

'I don't mean this in a negative way, but I almost wish he went through with me so he would understand the monster that he was up against and be able to rebound from it, and maybe he would still be here.'

Day and Prince, who became pals as teenagers growing up close to one another in the 1970s, started out as music allies. 

Day was the drummer for Prince's first band, Grand Central, and when the Kiss singer went solo he joined him on tour as his videographer.

Day and Prince became friends as teenagers and later collaborated on musical projects and films. Day (performing with his band The Time in 1983) went solo after a rivalry spawned from tour fighting and jealousy

Day and Prince became friends as teenagers and later collaborated on musical projects and films. Day (performing with his band The Time in 1983) went solo after a rivalry spawned from tour fighting and jealousy

Day, a former drug addict himself, admits he may have been able to save his friend had he confided in him about the depth of his reported drug use prompted by excruciating hip and leg pain

Day, a former drug addict himself, admits he may have been able to save his friend had he confided in him about the depth of his reported drug use prompted by excruciating hip and leg pain

Prince hired Day in 1981 to sing lead vocals on The Time, a funk group created as a special project for the artist by Warner Brothers Records.

Day acted as a creative producer on Prince's early albums and the pair starred alongside each other in the hit movie Purple Rain which grossed $70million.

After a musical rivalry spawned from tour fighting and jealousy, Day went solo scoring hits like Jungle Love and Bird.

In 1990 they reunited for the Graffiti Bridge album and film, but went their separate ways after more tension over music control and band management.

For the next three decades Day toured with various incantations of The Time, but never worked with Prince and only communicated with him through intermediaries and mutual friends.

But the 61-year-old star believes that their brother-like bond would have come to the fore had Prince confided in him about the depth of his reported drug use prompted by excruciating hip and leg pain.

'If he knew I was hurting myself, even if it was from a shrewd stand point, he would have said, "no man I am not getting that sh** for you." He would have done that for me. I would have done that for him,' Day said.

After several efforts over the last few years, Day and Prince finally managed to reunite when Prince paid him and The Time to play at his home in Chanhassen, Minnesota, for a private party in February 2016.

'He insisted that we come to Paisley Park to do a show,' the singer said.

'He and I had a colorful past, and he had stiffed me a few times, as wealthy as he was. Maybe he was just trying to teach me a lesson. But he had me show up a few times and didn't pay me the money I was supposed to get.

'So I said, "You know what, we're good, but I'm done. If you want me to do a show again I want a hundred per cent up front or I won't be there."'

Day said he was surprised when his former friend immediately agreed.

'He sent the money right away. I said "okay, this is different",' he said.

'So we go there, we do the show. Everybody was telling us he was out there partying, he was loving it. We talked after the show, and he said "I love you" and he gave me a hug.

'This dude has never ever talked to me like that or had that kind of emotion with me. I said "I love you too". Two months after that, that was it.'

Day told DailyMailTV the reconciliation was so touching that he wondered whether Prince knew he wasn't long for this world.

'Was he trying to tell me something? Did he know something?' the singer said.

Day said that even a year after Prince's death it was heartbreaking to relive his final moments with the star as he began writing his memoir.

'For me that was the toughest story to tell. It was very emotional at times… I waited beyond one year before I was even willing to talk about it,' he said.

'When he passed, every outlet, every magazine and television show, you name it, everybody wanted to talk to me and I wasn't ready to talk. But when this opportunity came about to do the book I thought what a great opportunity to tell my story, put it in one place, for everybody to see.'

Several hundred fans attended Day's signing for his new memoir, which he says details the 'rich history' the two men forged together.

'It was a unique relationship. We had a deep musical and friendship history that formed in the early days that really helped me form who I am today and helped him form who he was – and still is. He's created a legacy that will never go away,' Day said.

'We just had a rich history and a really great story to tell, and that's what the book's all about. I want people to be able to read and understand what that was all about.' 

On Time: A Princely Life in Funk by Morris Day with David Ritz is available for purchase. 

 

Morris Day says Prince was surrounded by 'yes men' before his death

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