Kenyan runner Brigid Kosgei, 25, BLITZES Paula Radcliffe's 16-year long women's marathon world record to retain Chicago title with extraordinary time of just two hours and 14 minutes

  • Brigid Kosgei beat Paula Radcliffe's 16-year women's marathon world record
  • The Kenyan runner ran a time of 2.14.04 to retain her Chicago title on Sunday
  • Kosgei's crossed the finishing line a minute quicker than Radcliffe's 2003 record 

Kenyan runner Brigid Kosgei has broken Paula Radcliffe's 16-year long women's marathon world record.

Kosgei clocked a winning time of 2.14.04 to finish comfortably inside of Radcliffe's mark of 2:15:25, set at the London 2003 marathon, to retain her Chicago title on Sunday after an extraordinary performance.

The 25-year-old went through the halfway point in 1.06.59 and barely fell off the pace as she pressed on to cross the line in world-record time. 

Brigid Kosgei broke the 16-year long women's marathon world record in Chicago on Sunday

Brigid Kosgei broke the 16-year long women's marathon world record in Chicago on Sunday

The Kenyan runner crossed the line in a time 2.14.04 of to become the new record holder

The Kenyan runner crossed the line in a time 2.14.04 of to become the new record holder

'They (spectators) were cheering, cheering and I got more energy to keep faster,' Kosgei said after her victory.

Radcliffe was present to congratulate Kosgei at the finish, with her record beaten by well over a minute.

'When I saw how fast Brigid was running in the first half I knew it was going to be broken,' said Radcliffe on Sunday.

Kosgei's achievement comes on an incredible weekend for marathon running, with her compatriot Eliud Kipchoge becoming the first man ever to break the two-hour barrier - albeit not under race conditions and therefore not a record - on Saturday.

Radcliffe relinquishes her piece of history, which was the longest-standing marathon world record by either men or women in the post-war era, at the end of what has been a turbulent few weeks for her personally. 

Paula Radcliffe had held the record for quickest time after winning the 2003 London marathon

Paula Radcliffe had held the record for quickest time after winning the 2003 London marathon

Radcliffe poses with the women's elite trophy next to her winning time back in 2003

Radcliffe poses with the women's elite trophy next to her winning time back in 2003

THE TOP 5 QUICKEST WOMEN MARATHON TIMES EVER

1. Brigid Kosgei - Kenya 

- Time: 2.14.04 - Date: 13/10/2019  - Venue: Chicago Marathon 

2. Paula Radcliffe - England 

- Time: 2.15.25 - Date: 13/04/2003 - Venue: London Marathon 

3. Mary Jepkosgei Keitany - Kenya

- Time: 2.17.01 - Date: 23/04/2017 - Venue: London Marathon

4. Ruth Chepngetich - Kenya

- Time: 2.17.08 - Date: 25/01/2019 - Venue: Dubai Marathon

5. Worknesh Degefa - Ethiopia 

- Time: 2.17.41 - Date: 25/01/2019 - Venue: Dubai Marathon

The 45-year-old was caught in the eye of a storm last week after appearing equivocal about US Anti-Doping Agency's investigation into Alberto Salazar, the coach who was convicted of doping offences earlier this month.

Salazar, who was working with Mo Farah when he won his four gold medals, was handed a four-year suspension following the investigation's findings.

Radcliffe admitted the decision to ban Salazar was the 'right' one but questioned whether the investigation was money and time well spent - something she was widely condemned for. 

The three-time London and New York marathon runner, who is an MBE and currently resides in Monaco, has been a vocal campaigner against doping in the past, but suggested money spent on the investigation into the Nike Oregon Project and its doctor, Jeffrey Brown, who has also been banned from the sport, would have been better directed on research.    

Coach Alberto Salazar (above) was banned for four years for doping offences last week

Coach Alberto Salazar (above) was banned for four years for doping offences last week

Radcliffe questioned whether the investigation was money and time well spent

Radcliffe questioned whether the investigation was money and time well spent

Head of USADA, Travis Tygart, hit back at Radcliffe for her comments on the Salazar probe

Head of USADA, Travis Tygart, hit back at Radcliffe for her comments on the Salazar probe

Radcliffe's comments were accused of being heavy with the weight of vested interests and corporate loyalties, while she also speculated whether the timing of the investigation was related to USADA's failure to get sprint star Christian Coleman banned, a claim she later retracted.

Head of USADA, Travis Tygart, hit back at Radcliffe for her comments last week, saying: 'I guess it's disappointing but that time and effort was needed to get to the truth. It was the efforts by this doctor and this coach to avoid the truth which [meant it] took as long as it took, which none of us our happy about.

'And the expense that went into it is was because of the money that was spent on the other side attempting to hide the truth. The rich and the powerful will cheat the world if you can't get to the truth because of the money and the power that those who are trying to hide the truth have. We took on the obligation to protect clean athletes and took on the job that we're supposed to do.

 'If people don't like that, that's fine. We'll turn spot into a free-for-all where you can have medication programmes and jeopardise the health and safety of athletes. If that's what we want sport to be, we'll close shop and get other jobs. But I don't think that's what sport should be and I don't think that's what athletes in clean sport and fair play want. I think sport will be ruined if it goes down that track.'

Brigid Kosgei breaks Paula Radcliffe's 16-year long women's marathon world record

The comments below have not been moderated.

The views expressed in the contents above are those of our users and do not necessarily reflect the views of MailOnline.

We are no longer accepting comments on this article.