Robert De Niro, 76, and Al Pacino, 79, look in high spirits as they are joined by Martin Scorsese, 76, at photocall for The Irishman in London

They are among Hollywood's most famous and celebrated filmmakers.

And Robert De Niro and Al Pacino were joined by Martin Scorsese at a photocall for The Irishman during the 63rd BFI London Film Festival at The May Fair Hotel on Sunday. 

Pacino, 79, looked dapper as he posed for the cameras at the event alongside his co-star and director, wearing a navy shirt with a black blazer and matching trousers. 

Co-stars: Robert De Niro, 76, and Al Pacino, 79, attended a photocall for The Irishman during the 63rd BFI London Film Festival at The May Fair Hotel on Sunday

Co-stars: Robert De Niro, 76, and Al Pacino, 79, attended a photocall for The Irishman during the 63rd BFI London Film Festival at The May Fair Hotel on Sunday

De Niro, 76, sported a grey shirt with matching trousers and a black blazer while Scorsese, 76, donned a wine blazer with a light blue shirt and grey trousers.

The Irishman, which hits UK screens on November 8, is the latest gangster film from the celebrated director.  

The film is the ninth feature collaboration between De Niro and Scorsese and their first since Casino in 1995.

Though the film's genre and cast has led some to expect a gangster thriller in the mould of GoodFellas or Casino, The Irishman is a more reflective, less flashy rumination on morality, violence and American power.

Film: They were joined by the film's director Martin Scorsese, 76, at the event

Film: They were joined by the film's director Martin Scorsese, 76, at the event

Movie: The Irishman, which hits UK screens on November 8, is the latest gangster film from the celebrated director

Movie: The Irishman, which hits UK screens on November 8, is the latest gangster film from the celebrated director

Through de-aging visual effects, the performances by De Niro, Joe Pesci and Pacino span decades of their characters' lives.

It stars De Niro as Sheeran, a mafia hitman and high-ranking Teamster official. 

Shortly before his death, the real Sheeran confessed to killing Jimmy Hoffa (played here by Pacino) — a confession that remains in dispute, with Hoffa's disappearance officially unsolved. 

Scorsese called his film 'an interesting hybrid' as both something made for theatres and for watching at home.

'All of us now are in an extraordinary time of change,' Scorsese said. 'But when it comes down to it, I felt - Bob (De Niro) felt - the picture had to be made for ourselves.'

Pals: Scorsese and Pacino looked in high spirits as they posed together on the red carpet

Pals: Scorsese and Pacino looked in high spirits as they posed together on the red carpet 

Collaboration: Scorsese posed for a photo with the film's producer Emma Tillinger Koskoff

Collaboration: Scorsese posed for a photo with the film's producer Emma Tillinger Koskoff 

Scorsese described the CGI used to digitally de-age De Niro, Pacino and Pesci in his new film as 'an evolution of make-up' at the press conference.

He said: 'If we made the film earlier they could have played younger but at a certain point we missed that and then they said "use younger actors" and I said "what’s the point of that?" CGI is really an evolution of make-up, you accept certain norms in make-up, you know he’s not that old, she’s not that young, you accept the illusion.'

Pacino added: 'I saw the film without any work, without effects and it was fine. I’m not the only one who felt that way. I think it’s really good we have it, we have this potential and it’s exercised in the film.

'In the old days they put an actor we all knew and love and put grey hair on him and we would be like "oh he got older", and you accept it because it’s in the story.'

Gangster's dinner: De Niro went for dinner with Pacino and their co-star Harvey Keitel, 80, at Scott's restaurant in Mayfair on Friday

Gangster's dinner: De Niro went for dinner with Pacino and their co-star Harvey Keitel, 80, at Scott's restaurant in Mayfair on Friday 

A jolly affair: Al (pictured) and Harvey joined De Niro as he headed to Scott's just hours after giving an interview about the new film all three of them star in
A jolly affair: Al and Harvey (pictured) joined De Niro as he headed to Scott's just hours after giving an interview about the new film all three of them star in

A jolly affair: Al (left) and Harvey (right) joined De Niro as he headed to Scott's just hours after giving an interview about the new film all three of them star in

De Niro said: 'I always joke my career will be extended another 30 years, where it will evolve. I am just happy we are at the beginning stages of it being explored and God knows where we will go and what excited me about it was Pablo (Helman, the visual effects supervisor) was doing this thing and wanted to make it state of the art, the best it could be.'

Scorsese explained of the fact that the film will stream on Netflix after the company agreed to foot the bill for the expensive CGI: 'Having the backing of a company that says you will have no interference, the trade-off is it streams with theatrical distribution prior to that, I thought that is the chance we take.'

'The new technology is bringing things that are unimaginable and not only is it something extraordinarily good for narrative films, narrative stores told emphasising motion picture images, but it opens up the original conception of what a film is and how it is to be seen has now changed so radically.

All-black ensemble: The Irishman, which has a running time of 209 minutes, has already won rave reviews from critics

All-black ensemble: The Irishman, which has a running time of 209 minutes, has already won rave reviews from critics 

'One thing that should always be protected as much as possible, and I think will always be there, is a communal experience and I think that is best in a theatre.

'Homes are becoming theatres too but it’s a major change and I think one has to keep an open mind. There is no doubt seeing a film with an audience is really important.'

Of Marvel-type movies he said: 'The value of a film that is like a theme park film, Marvel-type pictures, where theatres become amusement parks, that’s a different experience.

'It’s not cinema, it’s something else, we shouldn’t be invaded by it, so that is a big issue and we need the theatre owners to step up to allow theatres to show films that are narrative films.' 

Can't stop smiling: Pacino couldn't keep the smile from his face as he strolled out of the London restaurant in a grey baseball cap and navy coat

Can't stop smiling: Pacino couldn't keep the smile from his face as he strolled out of the London restaurant in a grey baseball cap and navy coat 

Pared back: De Niro wore the same pared back outfit from his earlier interview at the British Film Institution - black chinos with a navy polo shirt and a zip-up hoodie
Pared back: De Niro wore the same pared back outfit from his earlier interview at the British Film Institution - black chinos with a navy polo shirt and a zip-up hoodie

Pared back: De Niro wore the same pared back outfit from his earlier interview at the British Film Institution - black chinos with a navy polo shirt and a zip-up hoodie 

The event comes after De Niro, Pacino and their co-star Harvey Keitel, 80, all enjoyed dinner at Mayfair seafood restaurant on Friday night. 

The trio headed to Scott's just hours after De Niro gave an interview about the new crime film.  

And the three actors all have their fair share of experience when it comes to classic gangster blockbusters. 

De Niro shot to success overnight when he was cast in the Godfather Part II (1974) alongside Pacino, while Keitel hit the big time after performing in Mean Streets (1973) and Taxi Driver (1976). 

Devoted fans: Keitel and De Niro stopped to sign autographs for devoted fans who had managed to track the trio down

Devoted fans: Keitel and De Niro stopped to sign autographs for devoted fans who had managed to track the trio down

Crime-drama opus: The Irishman premiered on September 27 at the New York Film Festival, finally raising the curtain on the director's long-awaited, 209-minute crime-drama opus
Crime-drama opus: The Irishman premiered on September 27 at the New York Film Festival, finally raising the curtain on the director's long-awaited, 209-minute crime-drama opus

Crime-drama opus: The Irishman premiered on September 27 at the New York Film Festival, finally raising the curtain on the director's long-awaited, 209-minute crime-drama opus 

Relaxed and put together: De Niro cut a casual figure in black chinos, a navy polo shirt and simple loafers

Relaxed and put together: De Niro cut a casual figure in black chinos, a navy polo shirt and simple loafers

The three acclaimed actors looked in high spirits as they walked out of the high-end seafood restaurant flanked by security.

Pacino looked particularly jolly and couldn't keep the smile off his face as he strolled out of the London restaurant.

And Keitel and De Niro stopped to sign autographs for devoted fans who had managed to track the trio down. 

Pacino looked put-together yet casual in a relaxed ensemble that featured a grey baseball cap, blue coat and black scarf. 

The Heat star accessorised his look with some chunky silver rings and black and white trainers. 

'An interesting hybrid': Scorsese called his film 'an interesting hybrid' as both something made for theatres and for watching at home

'An interesting hybrid': Scorsese called his film 'an interesting hybrid' as both something made for theatres and for watching at home

'Extraordinary time of change': 'All of us now are in an extraordinary time of change,' Scorsese said. 'But when it comes down to it, I felt - Bob (De Niro) felt - the picture had to be made for ourselves'
'Extraordinary time of change': 'All of us now are in an extraordinary time of change,' Scorsese said. 'But when it comes down to it, I felt - Bob (De Niro) felt - the picture had to be made for ourselves'

'Extraordinary time of change': 'All of us now are in an extraordinary time of change,' Scorsese said. 'But when it comes down to it, I felt - Bob (De Niro) felt - the picture had to be made for ourselves'

Star: Before acting in the Godfather Part II (pictured), Pacino was making a name for himself in films such as Serpico

Star: Before acting in the Godfather Part II (pictured), Pacino was making a name for himself in films such as Serpico

Fame: De Niro shot to success overnight when he was cast in the Godfather (pictured) alongside Pacino, while Keitel hit the big time after performing in Mean Streets and Resevoir Dogs
Fame De Niro shot to success overnight when he was cast in the Godfather alongside Pacino, while Keitel hit the big time after performing in Mean Streets and Resevoir Dogs (pictured)

Fame: De Niro shot to success overnight when he was cast in the Godfather Part II (1974) alongside Pacino, while Keitel hit the big time after performing in Mean Streets (1973) and Resevoir Dogs (1992)

De Niro wore the same pared back outfit from his earlier interview at the British Film Institution - black chinos with a navy polo shirt and a zip-up hoodie. 

And Keitel dazzled in a dapper all-black tailored suit. He framed his face with tortoiseshell sunglasses and finished it off with a pair of chunky brown brogues. 

The Irishman premiered on September 27 at the New York Film Festival, finally raising the curtain on the director's long-awaited, 209-minute crime-drama opus. 

The Irishman is released in cinemas on November 8 ahead of its launch on Netflix.

Robert De Niro and Al Pacino are joined by Martin Scorsese at photocall for The Irishman in London 

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