'Shame on her and her inflated ego!' Lily Allen is blasted for suggesting patriotic anthem Rule, Britannia! should be BANNED... and is accused of 'crying over pointless things'

  • Rule, Britannia! is a patriotic British song, written in 1740 and originating from James Thomson's poem of the same name and set to music by Thomas Arne 
  • The anthem has long caused controversy, with critics insisting in 2016 that the song was 'inappropriate', 'outdated' and like ‘a UKIP rally’
  • Lily insisted the track should be banned due to lyrics surrounding slavery
  • Her post was swiftly met with criticism from fans who raged over her suggestion 
  • Lily's post comes just a week after she returned to the UK following a break in the US after insisting she won't return from America until Brexit is sorted
  • In 2014, Lily released an unofficial World Cup anthem, which included the lyrics: 'Rule Britannia, Britannia rules the waves'

Lily Allen has come under fire from fans after hitting out at patriotic song Rule, Britannia! just hours after Remembrance Day and insisted the nation ban the song.

After posting an article about her critique on Instagram, she was soon flooded with comments from fans - one of whom stated: 'Shame on her and her inflated ego!' while another stated: 'Do you propose we sing Smile instead?' 

Rule, Britannia! is a British anthem, written in 1740, originating from the poem of the same name by James Thomson, and set to music by Thomas Arne, but in recent years the lyrics have sparked controversy.  

Shocker: Lily Allen has come under fire from fans after hitting out at patriotic song Rule, Britannia! just hours after Remembrance Day and insisted the nation ban the song

Shocker: Lily Allen has come under fire from fans after hitting out at patriotic song Rule, Britannia! just hours after Remembrance Day and insisted the nation ban the song

The Smile singer, 34, took to Instagram on Tuesday to share her thoughts with her 1.3million followers, having frequently used her music and social media platforms to voice her political views - including her 2009 song F**k You. 

The musician appeared riled by the lyrics as she shared a message, reading: 'I think we should not read this song anymore'. 

She then uploaded a post with lyrics attached while voicing her shock, as she posted the message reading: 'Sorry what? Britannia rule the waves... 

'Britons never, never, never shall be slaves. The nations, not so blest as thee, Must in their turn, to tyrants fall, 

Stop:  After posting an article about her critique on Instagram, she was soon flooded with comments from fans - one of whom stated: 'Do you propose we sing Smile instead?' and pointed out the sacrifices of servicemen and women who the song is about

Stop:  After posting an article about her critique on Instagram, she was soon flooded with comments from fans - one of whom stated: 'Do you propose we sing Smile instead?' and pointed out the sacrifices of servicemen and women who the song is about

Shock: One of her followers hit out her and slammed her 'inflated ego'

Shock: One of her followers hit out her and slammed her 'inflated ego'

Fuming: One enraged fan left a lengthy message beneath her post

Fuming: One enraged fan left a lengthy message beneath her post

Not cool: Seemingly attempting to provoke the follower, Lily responded: 'Which generation are we talking about?', before a fan responded: 'any and every generation that’s fought a war... it’s Remembrance Day for all those that have served'

Not cool: Seemingly attempting to provoke the follower, Lily responded: 'Which generation are we talking about?', before a fan responded: 'any and every generation that’s fought a war... it’s Remembrance Day for all those that have served'

Cheek: Another fan suggested the country should sing Lily's 2006 track Smile instead of Rule, Britannia!, as she said: 'What do you propose we sing instead ? Smile', to which Lily responded: 'could be good'

Cheek: Another fan suggested the country should sing Lily's 2006 track Smile instead of Rule, Britannia!, as she said: 'What do you propose we sing instead ? Smile', to which Lily responded: 'could be good'

Shock: One of her followers insisted he saw nothing wrong with the song which appeared to rile Lily so much

Shock: One of her followers insisted he saw nothing wrong with the song which appeared to rile Lily so much 

'While thous shalt flourish, shalt flourish great and free. The dread and envy of them all', before posting a full shot of the lyrics. 

One enraged fan wrote: 'If it wasn’t for the brave men and women of that generation we would be German talking slaves... most of us wouldn’t be here now talking so freely without the horrible things that go on the world to assure our freedom.... 

'all this soft attitude will be irrelevant if a world war kicked off again, you’d all be depending the the people willing to do the dirt so you all can sit back and cry about pointless things... on another note have we left the eu yet'.

Hmm... Her post came in the wake of Sunday's Remembrance Day service and Monday's Remembrance Day (Queen Elizabeth, pictured at Sunday's ceremony)

Hmm... Her post came in the wake of Sunday's Remembrance Day service and Monday's Remembrance Day (Queen Elizabeth, pictured at Sunday's ceremony)

Seemingly attempting to provoke the follower, Lily responded: 'Which generation are we talking about?', before a fan responded: 'any and every generation that’s fought a war... it’s Remembrance Day for all those that have served'.

Another fan suggested the country should sing Lily's 2006 track Smile instead of Rule, Britannia!, as she said: 'What do you propose we sing instead ? Smile', to which Lily responded: 'could be good'. 

The Remembrance Day ceremony starts annually at 10:36am with a programme of music known as The Traditional Music, which always starts with Rule, Britannia. 

The order of music in the service has remained largely unchanged since 1930.

Stop: Lily has recently ignited controversy in the UK since she called for patriotic anthem Rule, Britannia! to be banned

Stop: On Tuesday, Lily appeared riled by the patriotic song as she shared a message reading: 'I think we should not read this song anymore'

Oh dear: She pushed her point further by sharing a screenshot of the lyrics

Oh dear: She pushed her point further by sharing a screenshot of the lyrics

The song has caused much division in the past, with critics insisting in 2016 that the song was 'inappropriate', 'outdated' and like ‘a UKIP rally’. 

In 2002, Rule, Britannia was removed from the repertoire at the Last Night Of The Proms in a break from tradition. 

Rule, Britannia: The lyrics 

Rule, Britannia! Britannia, rule the waves!

Britons never, never, never shall be slaves.

When Britain first, at heaven's command,

Arose from out the azure main,

This was the charter of the land,

And Guardian Angels sang this strain:

The nations not so blest as thee

Must, in their turn, to tyrants fall,

While thou shalt flourish great and free:

The dread and envy of them all.

Still more majestic shalt thou rise,

More dreadful from each foreign stroke,

As the loud blast that tears the skies

Serves but to root thy native oak.

Thee haughty tyrants ne'er shall tame;

All their attempts to bend thee down

Will but arouse thy generous flame,

But work their woe and thy renown.

To thee belongs the rural reign;

Thy cities shall with commerce shine;

All thine shall be the subject main,

And every shore it circles, thine.

The Muses, still with freedom found,

Shall to thy happy coasts repair.

Blest isle! with matchless beauty crowned,

And manly hearts to guard the fair.

Rule, Britannia! Britannia, rule the waves!

Britons never, never, never shall be slaves.

At the time, Leonard Slatkin, the American chief conductor of the BBC Symphony Orchestra, claimed the choice was a nod to the views of the public and the growing disdain for the track.  

He told Radio Times: 'We have had a lot of letters saying that it is time to get rid of Rule, Britannia, and I must admit I am not completely comfortable with playing it...

'[The song] does seem a little militaristic, and though it's wonderful to celebrate who you are and have faith in your country, I don't think we should exclude others. The Last Night Of The Proms is an important occasion...

'Anyway, I'm not certain the sentiments of the words resonate in the way some people think they should. It does seem a little outdated.'

In 2014, Lily released an 'unofficial World Cup anthem' called Bass Like Home. 

The track includes the lyrics 'God save the Queen, a pint of lager' and 'Rule Britannia, Britannia rules the waves', and mentions Paul Gascoigne. 

Lily's critique of the song comes after she recently returned to the UK following a lengthy break in the US as she awaited Brexit.  

She jetted back to the UK on Tuesday evening last week after insisting she won't return from America until Brexit is sorted. 

Lily took to Instagram to share a picture of her boarding pass with the simple slogan: 'I'm coming home', before answering queries from fans and admitting she 'thought we'd have Brexited by now'.

She has been living it up in NYC with her new boyfriend, Stranger Things star David Harbour, and while she was determined not to return, Lily conceded on Tuesday when she jetted out of the US before touching down the following morning.

Lily posted a shot of her boarding pass, which bore her marital name 'Lily Cooper', in what was the big reveal of her comeback to her home town.  

Last month, Lily vowed to stay in the US however Boris Johnson now extending the deadline until 31 January 2020, the London-based singer insisted she would be residing in the US for longer than expected - although she has now returned.

She's back! Lily's critique of the song comes after she recently returned to the UK following a lengthy break in the US as she awaited Brexit

She's back! Lily's critique of the song comes after she recently returned to the UK following a lengthy break in the US as she awaited Brexit

Lily Allen says the anthem Rule, Britannia should be banned

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