Now THAT'S a picture! Al Pacino, 79, reunites with Irishman co-star Robert De Niro, 76, and director Martin Scorsese, 76, at Beverly Hills party

He's had a starring role in Martin Scorsese's latest gangster epic The Irishman.

And Al Pacino, 79, reunited with his co-star Robert De Niro, 76, and the legendary director, 76, at the star-studded Ted's Holiday Toast in Beverly Hills on Friday.

The Hollywood greats teamed up again for the friendly snap following rave reviews from fans and critics for the new film, which was released earlier this month.  

Epic: Al Pacino, 79, reunited with his Irishman co-star Robert De Niro, 76, and the film's legendary director Martin Scorsese, 76, at Ted's Holiday Toast in Beverly Hills on Friday

Epic: Al Pacino, 79, reunited with his Irishman co-star Robert De Niro, 76, and the film's legendary director Martin Scorsese, 76, at Ted's Holiday Toast in Beverly Hills on Friday

All three men looked typically suave, with De Niro giving his friend and colleague Pacino a warm pat on the shoulder. 

Scorsese meanwhile stood beaming alongside the two men as he held a glass of wine and reveled in his latest success.

In another snap the director had his arm around his fellow film grandee. Pacino had earlier signed autographs for fans when he arrived for the event. 

We're the best: In another snap the director had his arm around his fellow film grandee, who showed off a patterned scarf

We're the best: In another snap the director had his arm around his fellow film grandee, who showed off a patterned scarf

A good combination: De Niro also chatted to Spike Lee, 62, and BlacKkKlansman star John David Washington, 35, at the event

A good combination: De Niro also chatted to Spike Lee, 62, and BlacKkKlansman star John David Washington, 35, at the event

Say cheese! United States Ambassador Nicole Avant got her chance to spend time De Niro and Scorsese

Say cheese! United States Ambassador Nicole Avant got her chance to spend time De Niro and Scorsese

The cool star wore a pair of dark shades as he pulled up in a chauffeur-driven car before performing signing duties. 

The Irishman tells the tale of mobster Frank Sheeran (De Niro) and the role he played in the disappearance of union labour leader and former close associate James Hoffer (Pacino). 

Sheeran alleged that he murdered Hoffa by shooting him in the back of the head twice in a house in Detroit.

Before his revelation, the disappearance of Hoffa had been one of America's greatest unsolved crime mysteries.

I'm here: A cool Pacino wore a pair of dark shades as he arrived for the party in a chauffeur-driven car

I'm here: A cool Pacino wore a pair of dark shades as he arrived for the party in a chauffeur-driven car

Thanks for that! Pacino then dutifully signed autographs for fans before heading inside
Thanks for that! Pacino then dutifully signed autographs for fans before heading inside

Thanks for that! Pacino then dutifully signed autographs for fans before heading inside

Hoffa's murder was only one of dozens of shocking killings which Sheeran admitted — many on Hoffa's orders.

However, on Wednesday De Niro was forced to defend the film amid scepticism about the film's authenticity from federal investigators and reporters who worked on the murder case.   

He told IndieWire: 'As Marty [Scorsese] says, we're not saying we're telling the actual story, we're telling our story. I believed it.'

Who wants one? Fans will have been delighted to get Pacino's signature after his latest film success
Who wants one? Fans will have been delighted to get Pacino's signature after his latest film success

Who wants one? Fans will have been delighted to get Pacino's signature after his latest film success

His comments followed a piece from The Daily Beast earlier this month which cast doubt on the Sheeran's claim that he killed Hoffa, and therefore the film's entire premise. 

Investigator Dan Moldea — who worked on the case — told the outlet he advised De Niro nearly five years ago not to make the film based on major inaccuracies which he claimed he found with the source material.  

Moldea, who worked with Scorsese on his other mob movies Goodfellas and Casino, told the outlet that he met De Niro to discuss his concerns five years ago. 

Can I pose with you? Pacino allowed one fan to take a selfie through his car window

Can I pose with you? Pacino allowed one fan to take a selfie through his car window

'I knew I had a finite period of time with this guy. I had to get to the point. I told him, "Bob, you're being conned."  

But De Niro denied he was 'conned' when he opened about the exchange.

'Dan is a well-respected writer.

'I met him in D.C. for a writers thing where they get together every year.

'He said that we were getting conned. I wasn't getting conned. I have no problem with people disagreeing. He, of course, is an authority on Hoffa and everything else.'

Shooting: The Irishman tells the tale of mobster Frank Sheeran (left) and the role he played in the disappearance of union labour leader and former close associate James Hoffer (Pacino)

Shooting: The Irishman tells the tale of mobster Frank Sheeran (right) and the role he played in the disappearance of union labour leader and former close associate James Hoffer (left)

De Niro said he found the material to be authentic enough to proceed with confidence in telling the story of Hoffa, who is portrayed by Al Pacino in the movie. 

'I know one thing — I know all the stuff that Frank said, the descriptions of the places he was at, the way he talked, that's all real,' De Niro said. 

'The way he describes what happened to Hoffa is a very plausible thing to me. I'd love to hear what actually happened to him. But this made a lot of sense to me.'

It was me: De Niro plays Sheeran in the film while Pacino stars as his victim Hoffa

It was me: De Niro plays Sheeran in the film while Pacino stars as his victim Hoffa

In the chat, De Niro said he's long been skeptical of the widely-circulated theory Hoffa's remains were buried under the former New York Giants Stadium in East Rutherford, New Jersey.

'What, you're going to take a body and carry it through and put it in the cement?' he said. 

'That's not going to be the most expeditious way of doing it.' 

Awkward: On Wednesday De Niro was forced to defend the film amid scepticism about the film's authenticity from federal investigators and reporters who worked on the murder case

Awkward: On Wednesday De Niro was forced to defend the film amid scepticism about the film's authenticity from federal investigators and reporters who worked on the murder case

Al Pacino, 79, reunites with Irishman co-star Robert De Niro, 76, and director Martin Scorsese, 76

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