Center for Middle East Public Policy

Center for Middle East Public Policy

The RAND Center for Middle East Public Policy (CMEPP) brings together analytic excellence and regional expertise from across the RAND Corporation to address the most critical political, social, and economic challenges facing the Middle East today. Our goal is to inform policy in ways that help improve the security and well-being of people living in the region.

Research Areas

Latest Research

  • Loading cargo onto a container ship in Istanbul, Turkey, photo by Czgur/Getty Images

    Potential Benefits of Economic Integration in the Levant

    Sep 16, 2019

    Egel, et al.

    A comprehensive free trade agreement among six of the core Levant nations—Egypt, Iraq, Jordan, Lebanon, Syria, and Turkey—could increase their average gross domestic product by 3 to 7 percent. It could also reduce regional unemployment rates by 8 to 18 percent.

  • Beirut Madinati candidates and delegates cheer

    Middle Eastern Communities Can Resist Sectarianism

    Jan 14, 2019

    Martini, et al.

    Sectarian violence in the Middle East has been destructive, but it is still the exception rather than the norm. Communities are generally resilient to the worst sectarian impulses. Lessons from Lebanon, Bahrain, Syria, and Iraq show that there are a range of actions that can curb sectarianism.

  • Workers in a textile factory in Igdir, Turkey, May 20, 2017

    Win-Win Solutions for Syrian Refugees—and Their Hosts

    Dec 13, 2018

    Kumar , et al.

    Turkey, Lebanon, and Jordan have generously received the majority of Syrian refugees. Many are working, but their sheer numbers have strained local labor markets, public services, and social harmony. Which policies might help create new economic opportunities for both the refugees and host-nation workers?

  • Dried herbs, flowers and spices at the spice souq in Dubai, UAE

    Food Security in the Gulf Cooperation Council

    Nov 28, 2018

    Efron , et al.

    Domestic food production is an ongoing challenge for the countries of the Gulf Cooperation Council. These countries are largely dependent on food imports and are subject to a number of potential disruptions. What strategies have they taken to increase domestic food production or facilitate access to imports?

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Recent Commentary

  • A convoy of U.S. vehicles after withdrawing from northern Syria, on the outskirts of Dohuk, Iraq, October 21, 2019, photo by Ari Jalal/Reuters

    How the U.S. Withdrawal from Syria Provides a Boost to ISIS

    President Trump's decision to withdraw U.S. troops from Syria could provide the ISIS terrorist group with the time and space to regrow its organization and extend its networks throughout the Middle East. The longer-term strategic effects of the decision could reverberate in the region for years to come.

  • A convoy of U.S. vehicles is seen after withdrawing from northern Syria, in Erbil, Iraq October 21, 2019, photo by  Azad Lashkari/Reuters

    The Syrian Withdrawal: Where Things Stand

    Without an orderly process for its national security decisions, the Trump administration has defaulted to the worst option regarding Syria. The sudden withdrawal of U.S. forces has left an opening for Russia to exploit. It also left the Kurds, a U.S. partner, to fend off a Turkish assault.

  • Iran's Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei delivers a speech during a ceremony marking the death anniversary of the founder of the Islamic Republic Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini, in Tehran, Iran, June 4, 2017, photo by TIMA/Reuters

    Iran, the Unitary State

    Oct 18, 2019

    Afshon Ostovar, Ariane M. Tabatabai

    Current and future U.S. policy toward Iran must begin with the premise that the Islamic Republic is the sum of its parts and that to try to empower moderates or disempower hard-liners is naive. Rather, Washington should strive to deal with Iran as it is, not as Washington wishes it were.

More Commentary »

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Our Work in Arabic

  • مؤسسة RAND في الشرق الأوسط: الموقع الإلكتروني باللغة العربية

    يقدم موقع RAND الإلكتروني باللغة العربية لمحة عامة عن عمل مؤسسة RAND في الشرق الأوسط، فضلاً عن تقديمه لبحوث مختلفة ذات صلة بالمنطقة. تجدون في هذا الموقع عدداً من الدراسات والأبحاث العلمية التي تتعلق بالصحة والتعليم والتحولات السياسية ومواضيع أخرى.

Focus on the Refugee Crisis

Preventing a Syrian Lost Generation

Since 2011, 12 million Syrians have fled their homes, either inside Syria or crossing its borders as refugees. To help shape policy that will improve the lives of refugees and support host communities over the longer term, RAND focuses its work on the greatest challenges related to this crisis: humanitarian assistance, education, jobs, and regional and global security.

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Photo of Dalia Kaye

Dalia Dassa Kaye

Director, Center for Middle East Public Policy; Senior Political Scientist

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